Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want

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Music inspires. It moves us in so many ways. It can unite us; it can define us. It can get you pumped up for a night out, soothe you in times of stress and, of course, rock-a-bye baby to sleep. "Yeah, tell me something I don't know," you're thinking. Well, I'll tell you something I didn't know...that the majority of conversations I was going to have since having a baby would include my breasts, in so many words. It tends to be the number one question I get: "How's the breastfeeding going?" followed closely by, "How's baby sleeping?" Because, I think, for people who are going through or have been through it (partners included), talking about breastfeeding is like trading war stories — the struggles, the exhaustion, the victories, the tears, the defeats. And let's not forget the "allies": lactation consultants, La Leche League, the Pump Room and, simply, the pump. When you're supporting a kid with just your breasts, it is quite the responsibility. And while all we mothers have them, it's not exactly food that can be taken for granted (or your baby's access to it). It's tough when you're dealing with life at its most precious...new. This is not a rant about how breastfeeding can truly "suck." (I think I did that already.) "It does get easier," I tell friends who gave birth after I did. For me, it really did. A month ago, while on maternity leave, I felt pretty fortunate to have gotten to a point when my baby and I were in sync with the whole nursing process. My body adjusted to give my girl exactly what she needed. No more, no less. Then, I had to go back to work, and suddenly I needed more. Problem was that when I first started pumping at work, I could barely eke out an ounce or two a session. (My baby consumes an average of 10 or more ounces during the day.) Pressure can do that, especially when it's scheduled between a staff meeting and a client conference call. Friends shared some pointers with me; things they'd heard about or have tried to help stimulate milk production. "Look at pictures or videos of D," they told me. "Do things that relax you before or while you pump." (One of my friends watches how-to videos.) And then a sweet young woman at work, who knew of my woes after she asked me about breastfeeding —young women are so curious! — started jotting down some songs to inspire me during my "lunch hour."  What was interesting was that just the act of watching her write those songs down calmed me, and I actually was very productive that day, upping my ounce output three-fold! Lesson learned. Music, baby. Now my baby and I both get what we want and need, even when apart. So to all you women who are struggling with nursing or pumping, I'm sharing "The Ultimate Rockabye Feeding Playlist" to comfort and motivate you in times of need. I dedicate it to all you mothers and especially to those little ones you give life to-who don't always cooperate during mealtime-with every painful and joyful drop. The Ultimate Feeding Playlist "Start Me Up" (The Rolling Stones) "Just Breathe" (Pearl Jam) "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" (U2) "Let Down" (Radiohead) "Try, Try, Try" (The Smashing Pumpkins) "Love Lock Down" (Kanye West) "Just Can't Get Enough" (Depeche Mode) "Don't Panic" (Coldplay) "All Is Full of Love" (Björk) "Soul to Squeeze" (Red Hot Chili Peppers) "Even Flow" (Pearl Jam) "Bigmouth Strikes Again" (The Smiths) "I Think I Lost My Headache" (Queens of the Stone Age)  Listen to the entire playlist on Spotify Milk on, ladies!

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  • I actually have a blog called Milking the Issue. http://milkingtheissue.blogspot.com/
    I created it not because I’m a activist about the subject. I just had so many problems with both of my children in starting and weaning. I didn’t have a problem in producing. My oldest was born with a cyst under his tongue, making his tongue not proportionate. It was hard latching him! Then one had a staph infection at 7 months and the other had meningitis at 2 months. Both very scary and odd. Breastfeeding through both of those times was hard.

    You are right it’s a topic among moms. As soon as one finds out that you have breastfed, it’s a full blown conversation.

    alissa apel on

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